pro
Change your cover photo
Change your cover photo

The Coastal Discovery Museum inspires people to care for the Lowcountry. Founded in 1985, the Coastal Discovery Museum shares the stories of our Lowcountry’s history, culture, environment and art through exhibitions, educational programming, walks, tours, talks, school field trips and more! We continue to be an outstanding resource and educational institution for our Lowcountry residents and our visitors, but we want to do more than just educate – We want to make a difference for our community by inspiring our visitors to act, to be better stewards of the environment, to cherish and preserve our historical resources, and to be active in the arts.

The Coastal Discovery Museum is located at the picturesque Honey Horn site located on the north end of Hilton Head Island. This 68 acre facility is home to some of the Island’s older structures and some of the most beautiful scenery. Stroll through the pathways around the property to discover the Camellia Garden (with over 135 varieties), visit the Karen Wertheimer Native Butterfly Habitat, stop along one of the three marsh-front boardwalks, visit Comet and Hawk (our resident marsh tacky and quarter horse). Inside the Discovery House you’ll find permanent exhibitions about the area’s history, culture, and environment. Temporary exhibits change several times during the year.

The Discovery Lab is a dedicated learning space located in the Supervisor’s House (c. 1890) with a 650-square foot addition. Inside, learners of all ages find out about the Lowcountry’s history, culture, and natural history throughout the year. Photography workshops, sweetgrass basket making classes, and painting classes are also planned for this space. Guided tours are offered to visitors throughout the year – on water and on land. Museum staff and volunteers share their expertise and passion about our local stories with visitors of all ages. Check out all the activities at the Coastal Discovery Museum at http://www.coastaldiscovery.org.


upcoming events:

Santa Elena - Piece by Piece

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33422 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content] => Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home. [post_title] => Santa Elena - Piece by Piece [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-elena-piece-by-piece-2020-09-21 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33408 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-21#038;p=33408 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-21 09:00:00 )
Beginning September 21 @ 09:00 am
Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home.
Find Out More

Hilton Head Farmers Market

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33393 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:12:25 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:12:25 [post_content] => Visit the Hilton Head Farmers Market at the Coastal Discovery Museum every Tuesday from 9:00am-1:00pm. Take home fresh local produce, pasture raised chicken, free range rabbit, pork, seafood, salsa, fresh sausage, cookies, breads, she crab soup, and more. Free Parking. Shop local, meet new friends, strengthen our community, and rebuild our local food economy! [post_title] => Hilton Head Farmers Market [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => hilton-head-farmers-market-2020-09-22 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:12:25 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:12:25 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33388 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-22#038;p=33388 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-22 09:00:00 )
Beginning September 22 @ 09:00 am
Visit the Hilton Head Farmers Market at the Coastal Discovery Museum every Tuesday from 9:00am-1:00pm. Take home fresh local produce, pasture raised chicken, free range rabbit, pork, seafood, salsa, fresh sausage, cookies, breads, she crab soup, and more. Free Parking. Shop local, meet new friends, strengthen our community, and rebuild our local food economy!
Find Out More

Santa Elena - Piece by Piece

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33423 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content] => Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home. [post_title] => Santa Elena - Piece by Piece [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-elena-piece-by-piece-2020-09-22 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33408 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-22#038;p=33408 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-22 09:00:00 )
Beginning September 22 @ 09:00 am
Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home.
Find Out More

Santa Elena - Piece by Piece

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33424 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content] => Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home. [post_title] => Santa Elena - Piece by Piece [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-elena-piece-by-piece-2020-09-22-2 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33408 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-22&eventSequence=2#038;p=33408 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-22 11:00:00 )
Beginning September 22 @ 11:00 am
Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home.
Find Out More

Birding at Pinckney Island

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33751 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-14 12:20:13 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-14 16:20:13 [post_content] => Led by an experienced bird watcher from the Coastal Discovery Museum, this walk takes place every Wednesday from 7:30-9:30 am.  The walk will include the combination of habitats at Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge.  These varying areas allow participants to see many different species of birds.  Several species of shore birds can usually be seen in the mud flats in the salt marsh, while many species of wading birds could potentially be seen around the marsh and fresh water lagoons. Cost is $12 per person (ages 12 and older, please, and reservations are required by calling 843-689-6767 ext. 223.   [post_title] => Birding at Pinckney Island [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => birding-at-pinckney-island-2020-09-23 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-14 12:20:13 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-14 16:20:13 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33748 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-23#038;p=33748 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-23 07:30:00 )
Beginning September 23 @ 07:30 am
Led by an experienced bird watcher from the Coastal Discovery Museum, this walk takes place every Wednesday from 7:30-9:30 am.  The walk will include the combination of habitats at Pinckney Island Wildlife Refuge.  These varying areas allow participants to see many different species of birds.  Several species of shore birds can usually be seen in the mud flats in the salt marsh, while many species of wading birds could potentially be seen around the marsh and fresh water lagoons. Cost is $12 per person (ages 12 and older, please, and reservations are required by calling 843-689-6767 ext. 223.  
Find Out More

Santa Elena - Piece by Piece

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33425 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content] => Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home. [post_title] => Santa Elena - Piece by Piece [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-elena-piece-by-piece-2020-09-23 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33408 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-23#038;p=33408 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-23 09:00:00 )
Beginning September 23 @ 09:00 am
Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home.
Find Out More

Forts of Port Royal

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33375 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:09:24 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:09:24 [post_content] => During the Civil War, Hilton Head Island was occupied by Union forces early in November 1861. The island’s proximity to Charleston and Savannah made it an important strategic location for the Union and was occupied throughout the War. On this guided history tour, learn about the Battle of Port Royal and the historic sites of Fort Walker and a later era Steam Cannon used for coastal defense. Wednesdays from 10:00-11:30am. $12 Adult / $7 Child (ages 7-12) / No children under the age of 7 please. [post_title] => Forts of Port Royal [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => forts-of-port-royal-2020-09-23 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:09:24 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:09:24 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33370 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-23#038;p=33370 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-23 10:00:00 )
Beginning September 23 @ 10:00 am
During the Civil War, Hilton Head Island was occupied by Union forces early in November 1861. The island’s proximity to Charleston and Savannah made it an important strategic location for the Union and was occupied throughout the War. On this guided history tour, learn about the Battle of Port Royal and the historic sites of Fort Walker and a later era Steam Cannon used for coastal defense. Wednesdays from 10:00-11:30am. $12 Adult / $7 Child (ages 7-12) / No children under the age of 7 please.
Find Out More

Santa Elena - Piece by Piece

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33426 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content] => Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home. [post_title] => Santa Elena - Piece by Piece [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => santa-elena-piece-by-piece-2020-09-24 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 11:17:33 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 15:17:33 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33408 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-24#038;p=33408 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-24 09:00:00 )
Beginning September 24 @ 09:00 am
Santa Elena – Piece by Piece September 8th through December 7th In the 16th century, Spain claimed the New World, today known as North America, and named it La Florida. The Spanish founded Santa Elena on Parris Island in 1566 and it became the first capital of La Florida and the first successful European settlement on the Southeast coast. This city flourished for twenty years and was then abandoned and lost to history. Slowly, over the past 150 years archaeologists have discovered parts of this settlement and have pieced together its fascinating story. Ongoing research has revealed new fragments that include the stories of the Native American people who lived here for millennia; the enslaved Africans who first arrived in South Carolina in 1526, and the French, Spanish, and English explorers and settlers who fought fiercely over this land we now call home.
Find Out More

Civil War Era

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33353 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 10:57:23 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 14:57:23 [post_content] => The Civil War is one of the most important events in the history or our country. South Carolina played a key role in the development and ending of the war. Hilton Head Island was home to thousands of Union soldiers during the Civil War. Find out why they were here and how they spent their time. Historic photographs, maps and artifacts tell the story of Hilton Head from 1861-1865. Thursdays from 3:00–4:00pm $12 per person , $7 child (ages 7+) / No children under the age of 7 please. [post_title] => Civil War Era [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => civil-war-era-2020-09-24 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 15:51:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 19:51:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33348 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-24#038;p=33348 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-24 15:00:00 )
Beginning September 24 @ 03:00 pm
The Civil War is one of the most important events in the history or our country. South Carolina played a key role in the development and ending of the war. Hilton Head Island was home to thousands of Union soldiers during the Civil War. Find out why they were here and how they spent their time. Historic photographs, maps and artifacts tell the story of Hilton Head from 1861-1865. Thursdays from 3:00–4:00pm $12 per person , $7 child (ages 7+) / No children under the age of 7 please.
Find Out More

Discovery Night at the Museum - Indigo Tie Dye

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 33530 [post_author] => 22 [post_date] => 2020-09-01 15:41:49 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-09-01 19:41:49 [post_content] => There is something special happening AFTER HOURS at the Coastal Discovery Museum. Indigo Tie Dye! Come and learn how indigo dye is made from a plant and use it create a tie dye t-shirt to take home. The Museum will provide you with one t-shirt (size Child M – Adult XL) to tie dye with indigo dye. You are welcome to bring an additional cotton item to dye. The property will also be open for you to enjoy and explore after hours. Thursdays at 5 PM. Advance registration online required. $10 per person. Maximum of 10 attendees. [post_title] => Discovery Night at the Museum - Indigo Tie Dye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => discovery-night-at-the-museum-indigo-tie-dye-2020-09-24 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2020-09-01 15:41:49 [post_modified_gmt] => 2020-09-01 19:41:49 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 33525 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&eventDate=2020-09-24#038;p=33525 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2020-09-24 17:00:00 )
Beginning September 24 @ 05:00 pm
There is something special happening AFTER HOURS at the Coastal Discovery Museum. Indigo Tie Dye! Come and learn how indigo dye is made from a plant and use it create a tie dye t-shirt to take home. The Museum will provide you with one t-shirt (size Child M – Adult XL) to tie dye with indigo dye. You are welcome to bring an additional cotton item to dye. The property will also be open for you to enjoy and explore after hours. Thursdays at 5 PM. Advance registration online required. $10 per person. Maximum of 10 attendees.
Find Out More