pro
Change your cover photo
Change your cover photo

World Affairs Council Hilton Head

WACHH is a vibrant community of thoughtful, educated people who are fascinated with world affairs. Our 1100+ members include academics, diplomats, business executives, authors, government service personnel, and people from all walks of life. Most live in Hilton Head and surrounding Beaufort County, South Carolina.
WACHH provides a forum to learn more about world events and their impact on the United State of America. We offer a variety of programs for our members, the general public, and the next generation – students in our area who participate in our outreach activities. We are a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization. We are a non-partisan organization and takes no political positions.

Our principal program is the Friday Speaker Series, which usually takes place on the first and third Fridays of each month – October through May. Speakers come from around the globe who are known for their international experience in government, business, military affairs and academia. Please check the program calendar for exact dates and topics. Friday Speaker meetings are held at the First Presbyterian Church. Guests are invited to attend as well(there is a guest fee).


upcoming events:

WACHH Friday Speaker Series: Taiwan- Cross-Strait Relations Beyond 2020

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32005 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2020-05-21 11:13:28 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-21 15:13:28 [post_content] =>

RUSSELL HSIAO: TAIWAN - CROSS-STRAIT RELATIONS BEYOND 2020

Madame Tsai Ing-wen won a second term in January 2020 to serve as the president of Taiwan for another four years. The first term of her presidency saw steady improvements in US-Taiwan relations and a deterioration in cross-Strait ties as Beijing ramped-up diplomatic, military, and economic pressure on Taipei to accept its terms for unification. As the power disparity between Taiwan and China widens, Taipei is becoming more susceptible to Chinese coercion and CCP General Secretary Xi Jinping may become more emboldened to use military force. What are the implications for the Taiwan Strait over the next four years and beyond?
[post_title] => WACHH Friday Speaker Series: Taiwan- Cross-Strait Relations Beyond 2020 [post_excerpt] => Return of Great Power Rivalries The 2018 National Defense Strategy acknowledges an increasingly complex global security environment and the re-emergence of long-term, strategic competition between nations. This environment potentially presents a challenge to U.S. prosperity and security by revisionist powers. China, Russia, and other economic and military powers want to shape a world consistent with their own. This upcoming 2020/21 speaker series will feature diplomats, military leaders, senior policymakers, and scholars that will help us make sense of this return of great power rivalries. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wachh-friday-speaker-series-taiwan-cross-strait-relations-beyond-2020 [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:34:31 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:34:31 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=32005 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-03-05 10:00:00 )
Beginning March 05 @ 10:00 am

RUSSELL HSIAO: TAIWAN - CROSS-STRAIT RELATIONS BEYOND 2020

Madame Tsai Ing-wen won a second term in January 2020 to serve as the president of Taiwan for another four years. The first term of her presidency saw steady improvements in US-Taiwan relations and a deterioration in cross-Strait ties as Beijing ramped-up diplomatic, military, and economic pressure on Taipei to accept its terms for unification. As the power disparity between Taiwan and China widens, Taipei is becoming more susceptible to Chinese coercion and CCP General Secretary Xi Jinping may become more emboldened to use military force. What are the implications for the Taiwan Strait over the next four years and beyond?
Find Out More

On Olympic Odyssey: An Insider's Perspective of Olympic History

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 34251 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2020-11-18 09:41:43 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-11-18 14:41:43 [post_content] => The 100th anniversary of the Olympic Games is a perfect time to have Dr. Mallon share the history of the Olympics and his unique stories gathered over 40 plus years of attending and chronicling the games and inspiring athletes you may have never heard of. This will be a great primer for the upcoming Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games.  Our fears have become reality as the spread of COVID-19 has forced the IOC and Japanese organizers to postpone the Tokyo Olympics by a year. This was a decision unique in Olympic history. The Games are now scheduled to take place from 23rd July to 8th August 2021. Dr. Mallon, a founding member of the International Society of Olympic Historians, will look back to the example of Berlin 1916 when the Games were canceled because of World War 1. There were few who imagined that the next Olympics would take place in 1920, only two years after the armistice. It was virtually a miracle that Belgium, the nation which had suffered most, agreed to be the host. The 1920 Games in Antwerp add resonance because they were also overshadowed by a pandemic that claimed more lives than the First World War. And still, the Games went ahead. This should encourage us as we take on and cope with an epochal challenge such as the coronavirus crisis.

The Evening Speaker Series is open to the public. To ensure the health of our supporters, we will be holding this event via Zoom webinar. Tickets are $10 for this event or $25 for a subscription to all 3 events.  Each presentation will be approximately 45 minutes long followed by a Q & A session. Registration is limited so sign up early.  

 

  [post_title] => On Olympic Odyssey: An Insider's Perspective of Olympic History [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => on-olympic-odyssey-an-insiders-perspective-of-olympic-history [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:31:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:31:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=34251 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-03-09 19:00:00 )
Beginning March 09 @ 07:00 pm
The 100th anniversary of the Olympic Games is a perfect time to have Dr. Mallon share the history of the Olympics and his unique stories gathered over 40 plus years of attending and chronicling the games and inspiring athletes you may have never heard of. This will be a great primer for the upcoming Tokyo 2021 Olympic Games.  Our fears have become reality as the spread of COVID-19 has forced the IOC and Japanese organizers to postpone the Tokyo Olympics by a year. This was a decision unique in Olympic history. The Games are now scheduled to take place from 23rd July to 8th August 2021. Dr. Mallon, a founding member of the International Society of Olympic Historians, will look back to the example of Berlin 1916 when the Games were canceled because of World War 1. There were few who imagined that the next Olympics would take place in 1920, only two years after the armistice. It was virtually a miracle that Belgium, the nation which had suffered most, agreed to be the host. The 1920 Games in Antwerp add resonance because they were also overshadowed by a pandemic that claimed more lives than the First World War. And still, the Games went ahead. This should encourage us as we take on and cope with an epochal challenge such as the coronavirus crisis.

The Evening Speaker Series is open to the public. To ensure the health of our supporters, we will be holding this event via Zoom webinar. Tickets are $10 for this event or $25 for a subscription to all 3 events.  Each presentation will be approximately 45 minutes long followed by a Q & A session. Registration is limited so sign up early.  

 

 
Find Out More

WACHH Friday Speaker Series- Russia and the Middle East

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32008 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2020-05-21 11:17:54 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-21 15:17:54 [post_content] => Although usually described as an “Eastern European” or “Eurasian Power,” contemporary Russia in the past decade has emerged as major actor in the Middle East. Moscow has demonstrated an unusual ability both to apply military force effectively and to practice diplomacy deftly, juggling and expanding ties not just with American adversaries like Syria and Iran, but also with American partners such as Israel, Turkey, and Egypt. Russia’s seeming success appears all the more remarkable given the routine dismissal of Russia by American observers as a declining power. What is the historical background of Russia as a Middle Eastern power? Is Russia’s success in the region real and what explains it? How sustainable is it? And what does Russia’s role in the Middle East mean for America? Michael A. Reynolds, a Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, is Director of Princeton University’s Program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and Associate Professor in Princeton’s Department of Near Eastern Studies. His teaching and research ranges over the geography of the Middle East and Eurasia and covers the themes of empire,  international relations, nationalism, geopolitics, ethnic conflict, and religion and culture. [post_title] => WACHH Friday Speaker Series- Russia and the Middle East [post_excerpt] => Return of Great Power Rivalries The 2018 National Defense Strategy acknowledges an increasingly complex global security environment and the re-emergence of long-term, strategic competition between nations. This environment potentially presents a challenge to U.S. prosperity and security by revisionist powers. China, Russia, and other economic and military powers want to shape a world consistent with their own. This upcoming 2020/21 speaker series will feature diplomats, military leaders, senior policymakers, and scholars that will help us make sense of this return of great power rivalries. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wachh-friday-speaker-series-russia-and-the-middle-east [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:30:45 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:30:45 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=32008 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-03-19 10:00:00 )
Beginning March 19 @ 10:00 am
Although usually described as an “Eastern European” or “Eurasian Power,” contemporary Russia in the past decade has emerged as major actor in the Middle East. Moscow has demonstrated an unusual ability both to apply military force effectively and to practice diplomacy deftly, juggling and expanding ties not just with American adversaries like Syria and Iran, but also with American partners such as Israel, Turkey, and Egypt. Russia’s seeming success appears all the more remarkable given the routine dismissal of Russia by American observers as a declining power. What is the historical background of Russia as a Middle Eastern power? Is Russia’s success in the region real and what explains it? How sustainable is it? And what does Russia’s role in the Middle East mean for America? Michael A. Reynolds, a Senior Fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, is Director of Princeton University’s Program in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and Associate Professor in Princeton’s Department of Near Eastern Studies. His teaching and research ranges over the geography of the Middle East and Eurasia and covers the themes of empire,  international relations, nationalism, geopolitics, ethnic conflict, and religion and culture.
Find Out More

WACHH Friday Speaker Series: How to Lose the Information Wars

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 32011 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2020-05-21 11:25:15 [post_date_gmt] => 2020-05-21 15:25:15 [post_content] =>   [caption id="attachment_34832" align="alignnone" width="200"] Nina Jankowicz, a Wilson Center Global Fellow at the Kennan Institute, [/caption] Recent cyberattacks have forced the United States and the Western to finally wake up to the threat of online warfare and the attacks from Russia. The question no one seems to be able to answer is: what can the West do about it? Central and Eastern European states, however, have been aware of the threat for years. Nina Jankowicz has advised these governments on the front lines of the information war. The lessons she learned from that fight, and from her attempts to get US Congress to act, make for essential reading. How to Lose the Information War takes the reader on a journey through five Western governments' responses to Russian information warfare tactics - all of which have failed. She journeys into the campaigns the Russian operatives run and shows how we can better understand the motivations behind these attacks and how to beat them. Above all, this book shows what is at stake: the future of civil discourse and democracy and the value of truth itself.
[post_title] => WACHH Friday Speaker Series: How to Lose the Information Wars [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => wachh-friday-speaker-series-information-wars [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:04:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:04:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=32011 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-04-09 10:00:00 )
Beginning April 09 @ 10:00 am
  [caption id="attachment_34832" align="alignnone" width="200"] Nina Jankowicz, a Wilson Center Global Fellow at the Kennan Institute, [/caption] Recent cyberattacks have forced the United States and the Western to finally wake up to the threat of online warfare and the attacks from Russia. The question no one seems to be able to answer is: what can the West do about it? Central and Eastern European states, however, have been aware of the threat for years. Nina Jankowicz has advised these governments on the front lines of the information war. The lessons she learned from that fight, and from her attempts to get US Congress to act, make for essential reading. How to Lose the Information War takes the reader on a journey through five Western governments' responses to Russian information warfare tactics - all of which have failed. She journeys into the campaigns the Russian operatives run and shows how we can better understand the motivations behind these attacks and how to beat them. Above all, this book shows what is at stake: the future of civil discourse and democracy and the value of truth itself.
Find Out More

Dr. Robert Spalding III- US & China Relations in a Post Pandemic World

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 34840 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2021-02-25 09:42:18 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:42:18 [post_content] => Dr. Robert S. Spalding will discuss the coronavirus outbreak; its spread and the CCP’s responsibility. He will also talk about the evolving rivalry and entry into a Cold War bipolar world. He will also touch on the implications of Artificial Intelligence, data, and 5G on national security and economic competitiveness. Dr. Robert S. Spalding III, Brig Gen, USAF (R) is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute. His work focuses on U.S.-China relations, economic and national security, and the Asia-Pacific military balance. [post_title] => Dr. Robert Spalding III- US & China Relations in a Post Pandemic World [post_excerpt] => China expert Robert Spalding reveals the shocking success China has had infiltrating American institutions and compromising our national security. The media often suggest that Russia poses the greatest threat to America's national security, but the real danger lies farther east. While those in power have been distracted and disorderly, China has waged a six-front war on America's economy, military, diplomacy, technology, education, and infrastructure—and they're winning. It's almost too late to undo the shocking, though nearly invisible, victories of the Chinese. Retired Air Force Brigadier General Robert Spalding reveals China's motives and secret attacks on the West. Chronicling how our leaders have failed to protect us over recent decades, he provides shocking evidence of some of China's most brilliant ploys. [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => dr-robert-spalding-iii-us-china-relations-in-a-post-pandemic-world [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:42:23 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:42:23 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=34840 [menu_order] => -1 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-04-30 10:00:00 )
Beginning April 30 @ 10:00 am
Dr. Robert S. Spalding will discuss the coronavirus outbreak; its spread and the CCP’s responsibility. He will also talk about the evolving rivalry and entry into a Cold War bipolar world. He will also touch on the implications of Artificial Intelligence, data, and 5G on national security and economic competitiveness. Dr. Robert S. Spalding III, Brig Gen, USAF (R) is a senior fellow at Hudson Institute. His work focuses on U.S.-China relations, economic and national security, and the Asia-Pacific military balance.
Find Out More

Mathew Burrows- Russia & China: Benign Friendship or Malignant Game Changers?

WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 34843 [post_author] => 81 [post_date] => 2021-02-25 09:48:04 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:48:04 [post_content] =>

Recent years have seen the old Communist enemies grow closer five decades after Kissinger’s opening to China.  Are we back to a new Cold War with the US and the West facing a united Russo-China front?  Both Moscow and Beijing share a deep resentment against Washington, propounding an alternative vision of non-US-dominated world order.  But, in a switch, is Moscow willing to be the junior partner to China?  Or is a growing friendship a tactical move until Russian sanctions are dropped and China attains better terms with the US?  A real alliance or a marriage of convenience?    

[post_title] => Mathew Burrows- Russia & China: Benign Friendship or Malignant Game Changers? [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => closed [post_password] => [post_name] => mathew-burrows-russia-china-benign-friendship-or-malignant-game-changers [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-02-25 09:48:04 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-02-25 14:48:04 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://culturehhi.org/?post_type=tribe_events&p=34843 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => tribe_events [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw [event_date] => 2021-05-07 10:00:00 )
Beginning May 07 @ 10:00 am

Recent years have seen the old Communist enemies grow closer five decades after Kissinger’s opening to China.  Are we back to a new Cold War with the US and the West facing a united Russo-China front?  Both Moscow and Beijing share a deep resentment against Washington, propounding an alternative vision of non-US-dominated world order.  But, in a switch, is Moscow willing to be the junior partner to China?  Or is a growing friendship a tactical move until Russian sanctions are dropped and China attains better terms with the US?  A real alliance or a marriage of convenience?    

Find Out More